AbelsonTaylor’s Ad Inducted into the Medical Advertising Hall of Fame

AbelsonTaylor Ad

It’s clear. It’s concise. It’s memorable. And it has just been inducted into the Medical Advertising Hall of Fame (MAHF).

Chicago agency AbelsonTaylor accepted the MAHF Heritage Award for its work on a medical ad that changed the face of pharmaceutical advertising. The ad, “Free the Flow,” launched Hytrin (terazosin) for Abbott Laboratories in 1993. The award was presented to AbelsonTaylor at the Pierre Hotel in New York City last night.

“Prior to 1993, most pharmaceutical advertising was very scientific,” recalled Dale Taylor, president and CEO. “It was common to see molecules, grids and dense content in journal ads. There was a perception that advertising to physicians had to be complex. When we introduced ‘Free the Flow,’ the industry quickly realised that medical advertising doesn’t have to be complex to communicate effectively,” said Taylor.

According to executive creative director Stephen Neale, everything about the ad worked to help physicians quickly and easily understand how a product could treat a condition that affects the prostate and urination. The use of the colour red, an old fashioned clothespin and the water-filled balloon all combine to aid physicians through the communication message.

“AbelsonTaylor’s campaign for Hytrin has been recognised by the membership as representing creative excellence in its highest form,” said MAHF co-founder David Gideon.

The MAHF was established in 1996 to preserve the history of healthcare advertising. Today, the organisation is one of the most respected in the industry. Each year, the MAHF honours the retired men and women who have made significant contributions to medical advertising. The organisation also supports and recognises young professionals who may someday earn their place among other Hall of Famers. This is the second year that the MAHF, through the Heritage Award, has recognised creative excellence and the creative teams who have brought great campaigns to life.