Clarisonic and PACER Partner Against Bullying

New #CleanTheMean Campaign Spotlights Kids’ Transformation From Bullying Targets to Bullying Prevention Advocates and Will Raise US $1/£0.75 for Every Post Shared This Year

October is US National Bullying Prevention Month, providing a spotlight on an important issue facing a reported one in five kids: bullying. PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center, the preeminent bullying prevention charity in the U.S., is on a mission to drive social change that ends bullying. The organisation works to put important resources in the hands of parents, educators and students alike, working to ensure that bullying is no longer an accepted childhood rite of passage. Today PACER and Clarisonic, the creator of one of the most-recommended skin-cleansing device by U.S. dermatologists, announce a new partnership and campaign designed to drive awareness and raise donations for PACER’s bullying prevention efforts. For every #CleanTheMean social post shared on Facebook or Instagram this year, Clarisonic will donate US $1/£0.75 to PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center, up to US $100,000/£75,375.

“We passionately believe that kids who feel safe, accepted, and supported will live up to their full, brilliant potential,” says Julie Hertzog, Director of PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.

“We are excited to join forces with Clarisonic to launch the #CleanTheMean campaign—a compelling way to spread awareness and encourage young people to be confident advocates for themselves and others,” added Hertzog.

“All of us at Clarisonic are inspired by the work that PACER has done to prevent bullying with education, advocacy and positivity,” says Elisabeth Araujo, President of Clarisonic.

“We’re excited to help make the world a kinder, more beautiful place, and hope people will join us simply by sharing one of our #CleanTheMean stories or one of their own,” continued Araujo.

The money raised through this campaign will help PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center continue to put important resources in the hands of parents, educators and students alike, including classroom lessons, school programming ideas, tips, tools, and stories of people who have transitioned from being a bullying target to a bullying prevention advocate.

Natalie, a 17-year-old from Los Angeles, CA, shares: “The best thing I did was reach out. I really felt like I was internalizing a lot of it and I was blaming myself. I was ashamed to go to anyone to talk about it. But as soon as I started opening up and telling people about it—telling my parents, telling a teacher about it that I really trusted — that’s when it started to get better.”